The Thick of It: An Unplugged Life






It's an epidemic. We all have succumbed to it at some point. I especially have, being a photographer. When I got my first dslr, I became the world's most obnoxious person. I took my camera everywhere and took pictures of everything. I claimed I was capturing memories from special days, but I overdid it big time. That's obviously why people hire photographers, you don't want to spend your special days taking pictures of every little thing. So why do we?

I've read articles on the horrifying downfalls of constant cell phone photographers, such as this one. It's obviously become more apparent to me since becoming a photographer, but I feel like it's the worse it's ever been. Cell phone companies are fighting over camera quality, even showing how little people enjoy moments in their commercials. These pictures I've posted do not qualify, for the fact that they waited for me to finish my pictures, then took their turn as I explained I would like to get a few candid shots of them taking pictures. It's nice when that happens, and perhaps because they're friends and family, I got a free pass to work without interruption. That is definitely not always the case. And I've been there, in the short time that I've been a photographer, firsthand to experience the consequences of a very plugged in life.


Right out of the gate, I agreed to shoot a wedding. Looking back, it was crazy. I hardly knew my way around my brand new Mark II, and I was taking on the biggest of photography jobs. It was new and scary, and I'm definitely skittish to weddings at the moment, but I pulled it off and learned so many lessons. One is having a voice as a photographer. I'm a natural introvert, and I hate being assertive, especially in uncomfortable situations. Because of that, I tend to let the cellphone mobs drown me. Sometimes I'll politely excuse myself to the side and let some people take their turn, hopeful that they will become aware and return the coutesy. Some moments aren't so flexible, though.


I took this picture at a candid, natural moment that I thought was beautiful between the bride and her maid of honor. The night before, the bride told me a friend of hers wanted to take pictures as well, and I couldn't find a reason that it may complicate things. While we worked around each other fine in the beginning, I caught this intimate moment, and she did at the same time. That nice big area was where I photoshopped her out of the picture. I never got word that anyone noticed, but my photoshop skills were definitely not where they are now. It doesn't seem like a big deal at the time, but so many pictures are ruined because of it. Some aren't too bad to salvage, but it's unnecessary hassle that might cause you to recieve less pictures.

Please be kind to your photographers, and allow the control to be taken off your shoulders. It's crazy how much we allow ourselves to miss out on, because we're racing to take and post pictures constantly. I want my wedding day to be my friends and family being completely participant and enjoying such a special moment in my life. I don't want to feel insecure while everyone is snapping unflattering cellphone pictures of me from weird angles. In return, as a photographer I will be courteous to guests at the right times. I challenge others and myself to put the camera down, and enjoy life without documenting every second.